buckwheat quinoa bread recipeThis buckwheat quinoa bread has a slightly tangy flavor and a hearty texture with a firm crust and a moist, soft interior. It’s essentially a sourdough bread without a sourdough starter. It’s vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

Making traditional sourdough bread isn’t hard, but the process requires some planning and practice. It usually takes 5-7 days to develop a healthy starter and then a few hours to make sourdough bread with it. This is because capturing enough wild yeast (in the form of sourdough starter) takes a while to leaven an entire loaf of bread. 

One exception is pseudo-grains buckwheat and teff, which naturally contain wild yeast strains. (1) This buckwheat quinoa bread, for instance, requires only a few hours to ferment and rise. The leavening relies purely on the initial burst of microbial activity. The wild yeast is not yet well-established at that point, but there is enough of it for the bread to rise and expand. This differs from true sourdough bread, which relies on mature, strong wild yeast.

Which one is better? This is simply a matter of preference.

buckwheat quinoa bread

Tips for Making Buckwheat Quinoa Bread

Ingredients

All you need to make a quick sourdough bread are a couple of ingredients:

  • Buckwheat: look for raw buckwheat groats (not the toasted variety known as kasha). Raw buckwheat is very light tan and has a subtle, mild flavor and a chewy texture. On the other hand, toasted buckwheat is distinctly brown, has a much stronger, almost bitter flavor, and crunchier texture. I typically let the buckwheat sprout for about two days, which is another important reason for using raw buckwheat. Toasted buckwheat groats will not sprout. 
  • Quinoa: I prefer white quinoa over red and black because white quinoa is the least bitter of the three and has the lightest texture. Quinoa contributes to a lighter and fluffier texture of the bread. It is possible to make this bread entirely from buckwheat, but it turns out denser and chewier.
  • Salt: the primary role of salt in bread is to evoke and enhance the flavor of bread. However, salt also regulates yeast activity, which means that fermentation progresses at a more consistent rate and acts as a preservative, increasing the shelf life of bread.

buckwheat quinoa bread ingredients

How to Make Buckwheat Quinoa Bread

This buckwheat quinoa bread does take a little over a day to prepare, but nature does most of the work. The hands-on time is only a few minutes.

  1. Soak the buckwheat and quinoa. Add the buckwheat and quinoa into a large bowl, cover them with water, and let them soak for 4-6 hours (ideally, no longer than 8 hours). The soaking water will likely be bright pinkish-red and slightly mucilaginous (buckwheat releases pinkish mucilage during soaking). Then, drain the soaking water and rinse the seeds well. 
  2. Sprout the buckwheat and quinoa (optional). Transfer the soaked buckwheat and quinoa to a strainer and set the strainer over a large bowl to drain any excess water. If using a sprouting jar, invert it into a large bowl or other object that allows it to sit at an angle. This lets water drain constantly. The seeds must stay moist but shouldn’t sit in water. After 8-12 hours, sprouts should start to emerge. If there are no sprouts, drain, rinse, and leave again for a few more hours. While sprouting is not necessary, it does boost fermentation activity.
  3. Blend. Add the sprouted (or just soaked) quinoa and buckwheat to a high-speed blender together with the water and blend until smooth. The batter might be slightly gritty, but no seeds should be visible.
  4. Ferment. Transfer the batter to a clean bowl, cover it with a cheesecloth, and let it ferment for about 14 hours at 80°F/27°C. The fermentation time will depend on the temperature – the fermentation rate accelerates as temperature increases. You are looking for the batter to increase by about a third and for lots of air bubbles on top and throughout the batter. 
  5. Proof. At the end of the fermentation, gently mix in the salt, preserving as much volume and air bubbles as possible. Pour the batter into a parchment paper-lined 8 x 4 inch/20 x 10 cm loaf pan and let it rise for 30-60 minutes. Ensure you don’t over-proof the bread; otherwise, the center will collapse during baking. 
  6. Bake. Slide the loaf pan into the oven and bake the bread at 350°F/177°C until the bread pulls away from the sides of the loaf pan and the crust turns golden brown, for about 90 minutes. 
  7. Cool. Transfer the bread onto a cooling rack and let it cool completely before slicing. Cutting fresh-baked bread too early will result in a gummy and sticky interior.

how to make buckwheat quinoa bread

how to make buckwheat bread

How to Serve Buckwheat Quinoa Bread

This crusty and flavorful fermented bread is delicious on its own with a little bit of plant-based butter. It also pairs well with savory spreads, such as hummus or puréed soups.

Like most breads, this buckwheat quinoa bread is best fresh. I usually time it so it’s ready to accompany whatever we have for dinner. Then I slice the rest and freeze it. Later, I slide the frozen slices directly into the toaster to make toast or to serve with a larger meal.

How To Store Homemade Bread

  • Storing at room temperature: wrap the bread in a large tea towel (so it can breathe) and store it in a cool place for up to 3 days. Room temperature is ideal for maintaining proper crumb and crust texture. 
  • Freezing: slice the bread first. Transfer individual slices into an airtight bag, one on top of the other, in an alternating 90-degree pattern, and press out as much air as possible. Freeze for up to 3 months.

I don’t recommend refrigerating bread. Even though the refrigerator delays mold development, it causes the bread to stale faster than if kept at room temperature (starch retrogradation occurs most rapidly at refrigerator temperature). 

Fermented Bread Variations

I have been experimenting a lot with different types of fermented bread. Buckwheat is great as a base for naturally leavened bread, but other grains and/or seeds with naturally occurring strains of yeast are an option too. I am currently testing teff, and so far, the results have been very promising.

As far as this particular bread goes, you can add different nuts, seeds, herbs, and spices. If using nuts and non-gelatinous seeds, you can add up to 15% of the total weight of dry ingredients. If adding gelatinous seeds, such as flax or chia, the total weight shouldn’t exceed 10%. My favorite additions are sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, and flax seeds.

gluten-free buckwheat quinoa bread

More Gluten-Free Bread Recipes

If you enjoy homemade bread, here are a few other gluten-free bread recipes you might like:

  • Protein bread: high-protein bread looks and tastes like whole wheat bread but is much higher in protein (and, in this case, also fiber!). Some of the most popular versions of protein bread are made with eggs and cheese, but I prefer plant-based protein bread.
  • Nut & seed bread: this bread is unique because it’s not light, fluffy, and airy like the typical flour-based bread. Quite the opposite – it’s nutty, chewy, hearty, and filling.
  • Flaxseed bread: if you’re looking for low-carb keto bread, this recipe is it! This flaxseed bread is mildly nutty, crusty on the outside, and soft and moist on the inside.

If you try any of these recipes, please leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

5 from 20 votes

Buckwheat Quinoa Bread

Prep Time: 1 day
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 day 1 hour 30 minutes
Yield: 16 slices
This buckwheat quinoa bread has a slightly tangy flavor and a hearty texture with a firm crust and a moist, soft interior. It's essentially sourdough bread without a sourdough starter.

Ingredients
 

  • 2 1/4 cups (414 g) buckwheat groats
  • 1/2 cup (90 g) quinoa
  • 1 1/4 cups (300 ml) water
  • 3/4 tsp. (4.5 g) sea salt

Instructions
 

  • Soak the buckwheat and quinoa. Add the buckwheat and quinoa into a large bowl, cover them with water, and let them soak for 4-6 hours (ideally, no longer than 8 hours) at room temperature. Then, drain the soaking water and rinse the seeds under lukewarm running water. 
  • Sprout the buckwheat and quinoa (optional). Transfer the soaked buckwheat and quinoa to a strainer and set the strainer over a large bowl to drain any excess water. If using a sprouting jar, invert it into a large bowl or other object that allows it to sit at an angle. After 8-12 hours, sprouts should start to emerge. If there are no sprouts, drain, rinse, and leave the seeds sprouting for 6-8 more hours. While sprouting is not necessary, it does boost fermentation activity.
  • Blend. Add the sprouted (or just soaked) buckwheat and quinoa to a high-speed blender together with water and blend until smooth. The batter might be slightly gritty, but no seeds should be visible.
  • Ferment. Transfer the batter to a clean bowl, cover it with a cheesecloth, and let it ferment for about 14 hours at 80°F/27°C. The fermentation time will depend on the temperature - the fermentation rate accelerates as temperature increases. You are looking for the volume of the batter to increase by about a third and for lots of air bubbles on top and throughout the batter. 
  • Proof. At the end of the fermentation, gently mix in the salt, preserving as much volume and air bubbles as possible. Pour the batter into a parchment paper-lined 8 x 4 inch/20 x 10 cm loaf pan and let it rise for 30-60 minutes. Ensure you don't over-proof the bread; otherwise, the center will collapse during baking. 
  • Bake. Slide the loaf pan into the oven and bake the bread at 350ºF/177ºC until the bread pulls away from the sides of the loaf pan and the crust turns golden brown, for about 90 minutes.
  • Cool. Transfer the bread onto a cooling rack and let it cool completely before slicing. Cutting fresh-baked bread too early will result in a gummy and sticky interior.
  • Store. Wrap the bread in a large tea towel (so it can breathe) and store it in a cool place for up to 3 days. For longer-term storage, slice the bread first and then transfer individual slices into an airtight bag, one on top of the other, in an alternating 90-degree pattern. Freeze for up to 3 months.

Notes

*Prep time does not include sprouting the buckwheat and quinoa.
**Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please feel free to make your own calculations.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 16, Calories: 98kcal, Carbohydrates: 19g, Protein: 5g, Fat: 0.8g, Fiber: 4g, Sugar: 0.2g
Course: Bread
Cuisine: American
Keywords: buckwheat quinoa bread, buckwheat quinoa bread recipe