low-carb flatbread - naan, tortillasThis coconut flour flatbread makes an all-purpose accompaniment to any meal. It’s soft, tender, pliable, and has a light coconut flavor. The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, and refined sugar-free.

For centuries, cultures around the globe have enjoyed gluten-free flatbreads distinctive to their particular region. Even though wheat and other gluten-containing grains have been around ever since humans started growing food, they weren’t always available, or they may have been too expensive.

Some traditional gluten-free flatbreads are completely grain-free, based on legumes or vegetables. Other flatbreads are made from gluten-free grains (e.g. corn and rice) or pseudo-grains (e.g. buckwheat and teff). So, gluten-free flatbreads are nothing new. Here’s a list of some of the most popular ones:

  • Legume-based flatbreads
    • Chickpea socca (Italian)
    • Lentil dosa (Indian)
  • Corn-based flatbreads
    • Tortillas (Mexican)
    • Arepas (Columbian and Venezuelan) 
    • Piki bread (Hopi)
    • Roti (Indian)
  • Rice-based flatbreads:
    • Rice paper wrappers (Vietnamese)
    • Banh xeo (Vietnamese)
    • Bhakri (Indian)
  • Pseudo-grain-based flatbreads:
    • Buckwheat crepes (French)
    • Teff injera (Ethiopian)

This coconut flour flatbread is gluten-free as well. However, it relies on a key functional ingredient found in the husk of seeds from Plantago ovata – psyllium. So, it’s not naturally gluten-free. However it is free of any gums, starches, and gluten-free flour mixes.

gluten-free flatbread

Tips for Making Coconut Flour Flatbread

Ingredients

You only need five basic ingredients to make homemade gluten-free flatbread from scratch:

  • Coconut flour: one of the most unique flours in the culinary world is coconut flour. It’s extraordinarily absorbent, dense, and dry, so very little is needed to successfully produce a recipe. Substitutions tend to be tricky, but if you’d like to make this flatbread with almond flour, you can follow this recipe
  • Psyllium husk: what makes the coconut flatbread soft and flexible is psylliumPsyllium is a form of soluble fiber that provides not only elasticity and structure, but also binding. It works a bit like gluten in traditional baking, and makes it possible to handle the dough. I prefer whole psyllium over ground because it has usually a higher grade of purity. The higher the purity level, the lighter the psyllium husk. This is why psyllium ranges from brown to off-white color. So, whenever you’re purchasing psyllium, get whole psyllium husk with the highest purity level you can find (so your flatbread turns out light-colored).
  • Olive oil: this is completely optional, but I like to add a tiny bit of olive oil for moisture.
  • Baking powder: although leavening is not always used in flatbread, it’s important with gluten-free baking to add lightness and fluffiness. If you don’t have baking powder, you can use third the amount of baking soda with a little bit of apple cider vinegar.
  • Salt: coconut flour is naturally slightly sweet. Adding salt balances the sweetness out. 

ingredients for coconut flatbread

How to Make Coconut Flour Flatbread

The preparation of this coconut flour flatbread is about as simple as it gets: 

  1. Prepare the dough. Add the coconut flour, psyllium husk, baking powder, and salt into a medium mixing bowl and stir to combine. Add the olive oil and water, and mix to create a dough. The dough will be wet and sticky at first, but as the psyllium absorbs all the water – it takes about a minute or two – the dough will get drier and easy to work with. 
  2. Knead the dough. Scoop the dough and knead it just until smooth, elastic, and pliable. There is no need to knead the dough for a long time since there is no gluten. I also like to let the dough rest for 5-10 minutes to let the psyllium absorb all the moisture. The dough will always be slightly moist, but it shouldn’t stick to your hands. It should come together as a soft, elastic dough. If the dough is too wet, add ½ tsp./2.5 g psyllium at a time. If it’s too dry, add 1 tsp./5 ml water at a time. Generally, it’s easier to add moisture than to take it away, so go slowly if adding water
  3. Roll out the dough. When you’re ready to cook the tortillas, divide the dough into 4 equal pieces. Pick up one piece and shape it into a ball. Place the ball on a piece of parchment paper, cover it with another piece of parchment paper and flatten it with the palm of your hand. Place the rolling pin in the middle of the dough (a handle-less rolling pin allows for more control than a pin with handles) and roll halfway away and halfway toward you. Turn the dough 180 degrees and repeat. If this is your first time making gluten-free flatbread, I recommend that you roll out the dough a bit thicker and smaller, no larger than 8 inch/20 cm in diameter. The thicker and smaller the flatbread, the easier it is to handle. 
  4. Shape the dough (optional). Depending on the type of flatbread you want to make, you’ll either want to create a round shape or an oval shape. I usually use a bowl or a lid to make a round shape and cut out a perfectly round flatbread. If you have a tortilla press, feel free to use it. Keep the outside dough to reform a ball and roll out 1-2 more flatbreads.
  5. Cook the flatbread. Flip the flatbread onto a hot, non-stick skillet and cook it for 2-3 minutes on the first side. Then flip it over, and cook it for 1-2 more minutes on the other side. Since I have made this recipe numerous times now, I am comfortable lifting the rolled out dough off the parchment paper and transferring it to a hot griddle. Another option is to flip over the flatbread onto a griddle with the parchment paper and then carefully peel the parchment paper off. I use a well-seasoned cast iron skillet, but I imagine that any non-stick surface will work. A stainless steel surface will not work! 

how to make low-carb tortillas

how to make almond flour tortillas

How to Serve Coconut Flour Flatbread

Because this gluten-free flatbread has a slight coconut flavor, it pairs beautifully with dishes that already contain coconut, such as Indian vegetable curry, Caribbean chickpea stew, or Thai coconut soup.

You can also use this flatbread as tortillas, roti, or wraps.

My kids love this flatbread in sweet applications – with sliced bananas and a drizzle of chocolate.

How to Store Coconut Flour Flatbread

  • Refrigerating: allow the flatbread to cool to room temperature. Transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for 4-5 days.
  • Freezing: allow the flatbread to cool to room temperature. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze with a piece of parchment paper in between each flatbread (so the flatbreads don’t stick together as they freeze) for up to 1 month.

coconut flour flatbread - vegan, paleo, keto

More Gluten-Free Flatbread Recipes

If you’re interested in more gluten-free flatbread recipes, I have a few on the blog:

  • Almond flour tortillas: if you’d like to make gluten-free flatbread with almond flour (as opposed to coconut flour), try the almond flour tortillas. The result is a more neutral-tasting flatbread, but just as soft and fluffy.
  • Almond-coconut flour flatbread: another variation of gluten-free flatbread made with a blend of both coconut flour and almond flour. 
  • Flaxseed tortillas: one of the most popular recipes on this blog are flaxseed tortillas – 1-ingredient low-carb tortillas.

If you try any of these recipes, please, leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

4.96 from 42 votes

Coconut Flour Flatbread

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 5 flatbreads
This coconut flour flatbread makes an all-purpose accompaniment to any meal. It's soft, tender, pliable, and has a light coconut flavor. The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, and refined sugar-free.

Ingredients
 

  • 1/2 cup (56 g) coconut flour
  • 2 Tbsp. (12 g) psyllium husks, , whole
  • 1 Tbsp. (15 ml) olive oil
  • 1 tsp. (4 g) baking powder
  • 1 cup (240 ml) warm water
  • (1.5 g) salt, , to taste

Instructions
 

  • Prepare the dough. Add the coconut flour, psyllium husk, baking powder, and salt into a medium mixing bowl and stir to combine. Add the olive oil and water, and mix to create a dough. The dough will be wet and sticky at first, but as the psyllium absorbs all the water – it takes about a minute or two – the dough will get drier and easy to work with.
  • Knead the dough. Scoop the dough and knead it just until smooth, elastic, and pliable. There is no need to knead the dough for a long time since there is no gluten. I also like to let the dough rest for 5-10 minutes to let the psyllium absorb all the moisture. The dough will always be slightly moist, but it shouldn’t stick to your hands. It should come together as a soft, elastic dough. If the dough is too wet, add ½ tsp./2.5 g psyllium at a time. If it’s too dry, add 1 tsp./5 ml water at a time.
  • Roll out the dough. When you’re ready to cook the tortillas, divide the dough into 4 equal pieces. Pick up one piece and shape it into a ball. Place the ball on a piece of parchment paper, cover it with another piece of parchment paper and flatten it with the palm of your hand. Place the rolling pin in the middle of the dough (a handle-less rolling pin allows for more control than a pin with handles) and roll halfway away and halfway toward you. Turn the dough 180 degrees and repeat. If this is your first time making gluten-free flatbread, I recommend that you roll out the dough a bit thicker and smaller, no larger than 8 inch/20 cm in diameter. The thicker and smaller the flatbread, the easier it is to handle. 
  • Shape the dough (optional). Depending on the type of flatbread you want to make, you'll either want to create a round shape or an oval shape. I usually use a bowl or a lid to make a round shape and cut out a perfectly round flatbread. If you have a tortilla press, feel free to use it. Keep the outside dough to reform a ball and roll out 1 more flatbread.
  • Cook the flatbread. Flip the flatbread onto a hot, non-stick skillet and cook it for 2-3 minutes on the first side. Then flip it over, and cook it for 1-2 more minutes on the other side. I use a well-seasoned cast iron skillet, but I imagine that any non-stick surface will work. A stainless steel surface will not work! 
  • Store. Leftover flatbread keeps well in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. For longer term storage, freeze in an airtight container with a piece of parchment paper in between each flatbread (so the flatbreads don't stick together as they freeze) for up to 1 month. 

Notes

*Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 5, Calories: 100kcal, Carbohydrates: 13g, Protein: 2g, Fat: 5g, Fiber: 9g, Sugar: 1g