FlackersThese homemade flackers are nutty and incredibly crunchy (similar to sesame brittle but without the sweetness). They are so quick and easy to make – you’ll love them! The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

 

Have you ever heard of Flackers? Flackers are flaxseed crackers that are made entirely from flaxseeds. They are one of the healthiest crackers in the market, made from real, plant-based whole foods that are nutrient-rich.

Flackers were originally developed by a doctor in Minneapolis as a healthy snack for her gluten-free patients. After gaining notoriety within the gluten-free community as a nutritious snack, they made their grocery store debut in 2008. Since then, Flackers have become one of the fastest-growing crackers in the alternative grain cracker space. 

The only downside is that Flackers are quite expensive for what they are. I mean, would you pay close to $7 for a small bag? I thought so.

Fortunately, these crackers are easy to make. 

homemade Flackers

Tips for Making Flackers

Ingredients

The ingredient list for Flackers couldn’t be any simpler:

  • Flax seeds: there are two types of flax seeds – brown and golden. Most people find that dark brown seeds have a somewhat stronger flavor than golden seeds. So, I tend to use the golden variety in recipes where flax seeds are the main ingredient. You can use either (or a mix of the two for visually interesting crackers). I prefer raw flax seeds, but if all you have is roasted flax seeds, feel free to use them.
  • Salt: one of the most popular variations of Flackers is “sea salt,” which calls for a generous pinch of sea salt. Other variations don’t call for any sea salt or just for a tiny amount. So, the amount of salt will depend on the type of Flackers you’re making.

flackers ingredients

How to Make Flackers

These flaxseed crackers are super easy to make and don’t require any fancy kitchen tools. 

  1. Soak the flax seeds. Add the flax seeds and water into a medium bowl and stir. Let the seeds soak for at least 1 hour. When flax seeds absorb water and swell, they release a gel-like substance called mucilage. This little trick makes flax seeds act as an efficient binding agent. You can let the flax seeds soak for up to 24 hours, which will begin germination, boosting the seeds’ nutritional value. However, the longer you let the flax seeds soak, the thicker the mixture will get. A short soak will allow you to spread the mixture, whereas a longer soak will require rolling. The only downside with rolling is that the flax seeds tend to adhere to the top layer of parchment paper. If that happens to you, you might need to bake the crackers with the top layer of parchment paper. Another option is to add a little bit of water until the mixture becomes spreadable again.
  2. Spread/roll out the mixture. Transfer the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet (you might need to use more than one) and spread/roll it into an even, thin layer. The thickness of the crackers is up to you. However, ideally, you would have about two layers of flax seeds. Too thin and the crackers will be very fragile, too thick and they will not crisp up properly.
  3. Score the mixture. Using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like. I cut the Flackers into squares, but it’s up to you. If you’re going for a more rustic look, skip the scoring.
  4. Bake/dehydrate. You can either bake or dehydrate the crackers.
    • Baked: I prefer baked Flackers. The higher oven temperature just gives the crackers more of a toastier flavor. The downside is that with the higher temperature, the flax crackers can burn more easily, especially if the mixture isn’t spread out evenly and some parts cook through faster. To make baked Flackers, bake them at 300°F/149°C until crispy and golden brown, about 40 minutes. The time will depend on the thickness of the crackers. If the crackers aren’t fully dry after ~ 40 minutes of baking, turn the oven off and leave the crackers in the oven. As the oven cools, it will serve as a dehydrator, drawing any extra moisture out of the cracker.
    • Dehydrated: the biggest advantage of using a dehydrator is that the low temperature preserves the nutritional value of the crackers more. However, dehydrating anything takes forever! To make dehydrated Flackers, dehydrate them at 110°F/45°C until dry and crispy, about 6 hours, flipping halfway through dehydrating. 
  5. Cool. Transfer the baked “cracker” onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate, and no condensation takes hold. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines.

how to make Flackers

Flackers Variations

Flackers come in several flavors – sea salt, rosemary, hemp & hatch green chili, black sesame & black pepper, tomato & basil, dill, and cinnamon & currants. 

You can add any herbs, spices, or even dried fruit. I really like the sea salt version, so I usually stick with just sea salt.

How to Store Flaxseed Crackers

  • Storing at room temperature: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and store them in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week.
  • Refrigerating: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and refrigerate them for up to 1 month.
  • Freezing: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and freeze them for up to 3 months. 

Flackers recipe

MORE SEED CRACKERS RECIPES

If you are looking to switch things up, I have plenty of seed cracker recipes on the blog:

  • Flaxseed crackers: these crackers are perhaps the most popular on the blog. They are made entirely from flaxseed meal, so other than being slightly nutty, they are also very neutral in flavor. Flax seeds are a weak binder, but since there are no ingredients to bind (other than the flax seeds themselves), the crackers are quite sturdy.
  • Nut & seed crackers: my absolute favorite seed crackers. Nutty, crunchy, and because the main binder is psyllium – a strong binder – the crackers are also very sturdy.
  • Seed crackers: the flavor of these crackers is very similar to these nut & seed crackers – neutral and slightly nutty. However, the texture is very different – these seed crackers are light and delicate (while nut & seed crackers are quite sturdy).
  • Chia seed crackers: if you’re looking for seed crackers with a bread-like texture, this recipe is it! These crackers have a slightly sweet, nutty flavor and a crunchy, bread-like texture. They are also sturdy enough to scoop up the thickest dip.

If you try any of these recipes, please leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

Flackers
5 from 1 vote

Flackers

Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Yield: 32 crackers
These homemade flackers are nutty and incredibly crunchy (similar to sesame brittle but without the sweetness). They are so quick and easy to make - you'll love them! The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

Ingredients
 

  • 1 cup (168 g) golden flax seeds, *
  • 1 cup (240 ml) water
  • 1/4 tsp. (1.4 g) sea salt

Instructions
 

  • Soak the flax seeds. Add the flax seeds and salt to a medium bowl and stir until the salt is evenly distributed. Add the water, stir again, and let the flax seeds soak for at least one hour. You can let the flax seeds soak for up to 24 hours, but in that case, soak the flax seeds in the refrigerator. However, the longer the soak, the thicker the mixture will get. A short soak will allow you to spread the mixture, whereas a longer soak will require rolling. If you let the mixture rest for too long (and it begins to get dry), you can add a little bit more water to make it spreadable again.
  • Preheat the oven. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 300°F/149°C.
  • Spread/roll out the mixture. Transfer the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet and spread/roll it into an even, thin layer. The thickness of the crackers is up to you. Ideally, you would have about two layers of flax seeds. Too thin and the crackers will be very fragile; too thick and they will not crisp up properly.
  • Score the mixture. Using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like. I cut the Flackers into squares, but it's up to you. If you're going for a more rustic look, skip the scoring.
  • Bake. Bake the crackers until crispy and golden brown, about 40 minutes. The time will depend on the thickness of the crackers. If the crackers aren't fully dry after about 40 minutes of baking, turn the oven off and leave the crackers in the oven as it cools. The oven will serve as a dehydrator, drawing any extra moisture out of the cracker.
  • Cool. Transfer the baked "cracker" onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate, and no condensation takes hold. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines.
  • Store. Leftover chia seed crackers keep well in an airtight container in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week (or in the refrigerator for up to 1 month). For longer-term storage, freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

Notes

*I used golden flax seeds because they have a more subtle flavor and a lighter color than brown flax seeds.
**Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 32, Calories: 28kcal, Carbohydrates: 1g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 2g, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 0g