flax crackers from flaxseeds

These flaxseed crackers are nutty, crispy, and crunchy.  Since they contain nothing but flax seeds, you can really make them exactly to your taste. These crackers are vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

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Flax seeds play a really important role in creating gluten-free baked goods with great texture. They are a type of hydrophilic binder (they gel upon contact with water-based liquids) and require time to work (they need a few minutes to create a “glue” to keep the baked goods together).

Flax seeds are effective enough to be used alone in recipes, but work the best in combination with other hydrophilic binders, such as chia seeds and psyllium. This is because out of the three main hydrophilic binders – flax, chia, and psyllium – flax seeds have the weakest binding effect. The binding effect does increase when the seeds are ground, but it is still weak.

So, for best result, flax seeds shouldn’t make up more than 75% of a binder. The one exception is when flax seeds themselves constitute 50% or more of the entire recipe, e.g., these flaxseed crackers.

flax crackers from flaxseeds

Tips for Making Flaxseed Crackers

Ingredients

The ingredient list for these flaxseed crackers couldn’t be any simpler: 

  • Flax seeds: there are two types of flax seeds – brown and golden. Most people find that the dark brown seeds have a somewhat stronger flavor than the golden seeds. So, in recipes where flax seeds are the main ingredient, I tend to use the golden variety. I prefer raw flax seeds, but if all you have is roasted flax seeds, feel free to use them.
  • Salt: without salt, these crackers are quite bland, so I recommend using not only salt, but also herbs and/or spices. So far I have tried basil, cumin, garlic powder, rosemary (my favorite!), and thyme. 

 

flaxseed crackers

How to Make Flaxseed Crackers

If you haven’t tried making your own homemade crackers yet, this is your chance:

  1. Mix. Add the flaxseed meal, salt, and water into a medium bowl and mix until well combined. The dough will be wet and sticky at first, but as the flaxseed meal absorbs all the water, the dough will become drier. The dough will always be slightly sticky, but it should be easy to handle. If it’s too sticky or wet, sprinkle a little bit more flaxseed meal onto the dough to dry it out. Form the dough into a ball.
  2. Roll out the dough. Place the dough between two pieces of parchment paper and flatten it with the palm of your hand. Place the center of your rolling pin on the center of the disk. Press firmly into the dough, rolling towards yourself and away from you. Repeat until the dough is about ⅛ inch/3 mm thin. The fine texture of the flaxseed meal will allow you to roll the dough out as thin or as thick as you like. Thinner crackers cook faster and become crispier. However, they are also more delicate and prone to breaking. Thicker crackers are better for scooping up dips. Regardless of the thickness, make sure the crackers are rolled out evenly, so the crackers bake at the same rate.
  3. Score the dough. Peel off the top layer of parchment paper. Using a knife or a pizza cutter, score the dough into any shapes you like. I cut the flaxseed crackers into squares, but it’s up to you. You can also use cookie cutters for more interesting shapes.
  4. Bake. Carefully slide the dough (with the bottom layer of parchment paper) onto a large baking sheet and bake it at 350°F/180°C until crispy and golden brown, 20-25 minutes. I recommend checking the crackers every 5 minutes after the first 15 minutes of baking. If your crackers are thinner than mine, they will bake faster. Also, the crackers on the outside edges of the baking sheet will brown quicker than the ones in the center and crackers at the back of the oven may turn golden sooner than the ones at the front. So, rotate the baking sheet during baking to even out the browning. If you find that most of the crackers are cooked through but a few right in the center are a little soft, bake those few again until they have dried out more, about 5 minutes.
  5. Cool. Transfer the baked “cracker” onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate and no condensation takes hold. The higher the baking temperature, the more condensation can form. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines.

Flaxseed Crackers Variations

Flaxseed crackers are literally a blank canvas for experimentation. My favorite flavor combination is garlic powder and rosemary, but other herbs, spices, or even nutritional yeast work equally well. 

You could also incorporate small seeds, such as sesame seeds or hemp hearts, into the dough for more texture. Just make sure to avoid chia seeds – a type of gelatinous seeds – which would affect the consistency of the dough.

How to Store Flaxseed Crackers

  • Storing at room temperature: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and store in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week.
  • Refrigerating: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 1 month.
  • Freezing: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. 

MORE SEED CRACKERS RECIPES

If you are looking to switch things up, I have a plenty of seed cracker recipes on the blog:

  • Flackers: crackers made entirely from whole flax seeds. They are nutty and incredibly crunchy – similar to sesame brittle but without the sweetness. 
  • Nut & seed crackers: my absolute favorite seed crackers. Nutty, crunchy, and because the main binder is psyllium – a strong binder – the crackers are also very sturdy.
  • Seed crackers: the flavor of these crackers is very similar to these nut & seed crackers – neutral and slightly nutty. However, the texture is very different – these seed crackers are light and delicate (while nut & seed crackers are quite sturdy).
  • Chia seed crackers: if you’re looking for seed crackers with a bread-like texture, this recipe is it! These crackers have a slightly sweet, nutty flavor and a crunchy, bread-like texture. They are also sturdy enough to scoop up the thickest dip.

If you try any of these recipes, please, leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

flax crackers from flaxseeds
4.91 from 10 votes

Flaxseed Crackers

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 40 crackers
These flaxseed crackers are nutty, crispy, and crunchy.  Since they contain nothing but flax seeds, you can really make them exactly to your taste. These crackers are vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

Ingredients
 

  • 1 cup (112 g) flaxseed meal, *
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.9 g) salt

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 350°F/180°C.
  • Mix. Add the flaxseed meal, salt, and water into a medium bowl and mix until well combined. The dough will be wet and sticky at first, but as the flaxseed meal absorbs all the water, the dough will become drier. The dough will always be slightly sticky, but it should be easy to handle. If it's too sticky or wet, sprinkle a little bit more flaxseed meal onto the dough to dry it out. Form the dough into a ball.
  • Roll out the dough. Place the dough between two pieces of parchment paper and flatten it with the palm of your hand. Place the center of your rolling pin on the center of the disk. Press firmly into the dough, rolling towards yourself and away from you. Repeat until the dough is about ⅛ inch/3 mm thin. The fine texture of the flaxseed meal will allow you to roll the dough out as thin or as thick as you like. Thinner crackers cook faster and become crispier. However, they are also more delicate and prone to breaking. Thicker crackers are better for scooping up dips. Regardless of the thickness, make sure the crackers are rolled out evenly, so the crackers bake at the same rate.
  • Score the dough. Peel off the top layer of parchment paper. Using a knife or a pizza cutter, score the dough into any shapes you like. I cut the flaxseed crackers into squares, but it's up to you. You can also use cookie cutters for more interesting shapes.
  • Bake. Carefully slide the dough (with the bottom layer of parchment paper) onto a large baking sheet and bake until crispy and golden brown, 20-25 minutes, flipping halfway through baking**. I recommend checking the crackers every 5 minutes after the first 15 minutes of baking. If your crackers are thinner than mine, they will bake faster. Also, the crackers on the outside edges of the baking sheet will brown quicker than the ones in the center and crackers at the back of the oven may turn golden sooner than the ones at the front. So, rotate the baking sheet during baking to even out the browning. If you find that most of the crackers are cooked through but a few right in the center are a little soft, bake those few again until they have dried out more, about 5 minutes. 
  • Cool. Transfer the baked “cracker” onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate and no condensation takes hold. The higher the baking temperature, the more condensation can form. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines.
  • Store. Leftover chia seed crackers keep well in an airtight container in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week (or in the refrigerator for up to 1 month). For longer term storage, freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

Notes

*I used golden flax seeds because they have a more subtle flavor and lighter color than brown flax seeds. I like to grind my own flax seeds into flaxseed meal, but you can store-bought flaxseed meal.
**The easiest way to flip the cracker is to slide the parchment paper from the baking sheet onto a big cutting board. Then cover the cutting board with the baking sheet and flip the cutting board over.
***Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 40, Calories: 21kcal, Carbohydrates: 1g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 2g, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 0g