nut and seed crackersThese nut and seed crackers are nutty, light, crispy, and customizable. They are really easy to make and pretty hard to mess up. Since the crackers consist of mostly just nuts and seeds, the recipe is naturally vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, refined sugar-free, and great for those on a low-carb diet.

While some foods seem easy to make, others may appear trickier at first glance. For example, baking a loaf of bread is pretty common, but you don’t find many people coming up with their own crackers! There seems to be a misconception that making homemade crackers isn’t easy, since it’s not as obvious how to make them compared to baking something like bread. 

The truth is that crackers are far easier and faster to make than breads. These nut and seed crackers are actually the same recipe as this nut and seed bread. That’s right. The same recipe with a different method. Even if you’ve never baked a loaf of bread in your life, you’ll be amazed how easy it is to make these crackers.

If you’re not sold on making crackers out of a bread recipe, there are other (easy) ways to make crackers. For instance, you can cut tortilla wraps into chips. I do this with my 1-ingredient flaxseed tortillas and almond flour tortillas at least once a week. Recently, I also found out that you can also make excellent crackers out of lentils and chickpeas. So, now I make crackers not only from nuts and seeds, but also from legumes.

multi-seeded crackers

Tips for Making Nut and Seed Crackers

Ingredients

As the name suggests, these nut and seed crackers are made from pretty much just nuts and seeds:

  • Nuts: almonds and hazelnuts are my go-to nuts for these crackers. They are a type of hard nuts, and so they are easy to grind into a fine meal. Soft, chewy nuts, such as walnuts and pecans, work too but you have to be more careful not to over-process them.
  • Seeds: there are two types of seeds in this recipe – non-gelatinous and gelatinous. Non-gelatinous seeds include sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, hemp seeds… any seeds that don’t gel when you mix them with water. You can easily substitute one variety for another, use them in different combinations, or swap them for nuts. Gelatinous seeds, such as chia seeds and flax seeds, have special binding properties and help the crackers hold together. You can use them in different ratios, but not substitute them for non-gelatinous seeds or nuts.
  • Psyllium: the main ingredient holding these nut and seed crackers together is psyllium – a form of soluble fiber derived from the outer portion of the seeds of the Plantago ovata plant. It’s typically processed into one of three forms: whole psyllium husk, psyllium husk powder, and psyllium seed powder. Although each supplement is derived from the same raw seeds, they contain different amounts of soluble fiber, which changes the product’s properties. Psyllium husk – whole or powdered – contains only Plantago ovata seed husks. Psyllium seed powder consists of the husk and seed ground together. This recipe calls for whole psyllium husk.
  • Salt: you can make virtually endless flavors of these crackers. Whichever flavor you go with – using herbs, spices, dried fruit, etc. – always add at least a little bit of salt. Pink Himalayan salt is my favorite, but any salt will enhance the flavor of crackers.

ingredients for nut and seed crackers

How to Make Nut & Seed Crackers

If you have ever made my nut & seed bread, you know that the process is really quick and easy. These nut and seed crackers are no different. The only difference between making a loaf of bread and crackers is that instead of shaping a loaf (or using a loaf pan), you need to roll out the dough into a thin sheet. Here’s the step-by-step process:

  1. Process the nuts and seeds. Add the almonds, hazelnuts, and pumpkin seeds into a food processor fitted with an S blade and process the nuts and seeds into a fine meal. If you don’t like a lot of texture, you can also process the sunflower seeds or at least chop them up. I usually process about half of the sunflower seeds with the rest of the nuts and seeds. If you don’t have a food processor, you can use a high-speed blender to turn nuts and seeds into flour or start with nut/seed flour (as opposed to whole nuts).
  2. Mix. Add the processed nuts, seeds, psyllium, and salt into a large bowl and mix until well combined. Add the water and mix again. As the gelatinous seeds and psyllium absorb water, all the ingredients will sort of clump together. If the mixture is too thick or some of the dry ingredients aren’t completely soaked, add more water, 1 Tbsp./15 ml at a time.
  3. Roll out the mixture. Divide mixture roughly in half. Spoon the first half of the mixture onto a piece of parchment paper, cover it with another piece of parchment paper, and roll it out into a thin sheet. If you happen to have any holes in the rolled out mixture, just grab a little bit of the mixture and patch it. I usually use a rolling pin and just roll the new piece over the hole. 
  4. Score the mixture. Remove the top layer of parchment paper and using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like. I usually cut the nut and seed crackers into large triangles, but it’s up to you. You can also use cookie cutters for more interesting shapes.
  5. Bake. Transfer the mixture (with the bottom sheet of parchment paper) onto a large baking sheet and bake it at 350°F/175°C until crispy and golden brown, about 30 minutes, flipping the cracker halfway through baking. If one side of the crackers is more golden than the other, rotate the baking sheet for the best chance of all the crackers baking evenly. I usually only do this once, halfway through baking time.
  6. Cool. Transfer the baked “cracker” onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate and no condensation — the killer of crunch — takes hold. The higher the baking temperature, the more condensation can form. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines.

how to make nut and seed crackers

how to make nut & seed crackers

Nut and Seed Crackers Variations

The wonderful thing about these nut and seed crackers is that they are quite neutral in flavor and as such a blank canvas. You can make them savory or sweet. Some of my favorite variations include rosemary & garlic, black pepper & seasoned salt, figs & anise. Of course, you can also keep the nut and seed crackers plain.

I usually divide the mixture and make a few different types of crackers from one batch.

How to Store Nut & Seed Crackers

  • Storing at room temperature: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and store in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week.
  • Refrigerating: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 1 month.
  • Freezing: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. 

crackers with nuts and seeds

MORE SEED CRACKERS RECIPES

If you are looking to switch things up, I have a plenty of seed cracker recipes on the blog:

  • Flaxseed crackers: these crackers are perhaps the most popular on the blog. They are made entirely from flaxseed meal, so other than being slightly nutty, they are also very neutral in flavor. 
  • Seed crackers: the flavor of these crackers is very similar to these nut & seed crackers – neutral and slightly nutty. However, the texture is very different – these seed crackers are light and delicate (while nut & seed crackers are quite sturdy).
  • Chia seed crackers: if you’re looking for seed crackers with a bread-like texture, this recipe is it! These crackers have a slightly sweet, nutty flavor and a crunchy, bread-like texture. They are also sturdy enough to scoop up the thickest dip.
  • Flackers: crackers made entirely from whole flax seeds. They are nutty and incredibly crunchy – similar to sesame brittle but without the sweetness. 

If you try any of these recipes, please, leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

nut and seed crackers
5 from 8 votes

Nut and Seed Crackers

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Yield: 64 crackers
These nut and seed crackers are nutty, light, crispy, and customizable. They are really easy to make and pretty hard to mess up. Since the crackers consist of mostly just nuts and seeds, the recipe is naturally vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, refined sugar-free, and great for those on a low-carb diet.

Ingredients
 

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 350°F/175°C.
  • Process the nuts. Add the almonds, hazelnuts and pumpkin seeds into a food processor fitted with an S blade and process into a fine meal. If you don't like a lot of texture, you can also process the sunflower seeds.
  • Mix. Add all the nuts and seeds, sunflower seeds, psyllium, and salt into a large bowl and mix until well combined. Add the water and mix again. If the mixture is too thick or some of the dry ingredients aren't completely soaked, add more water, 1 Tbsp./15 ml at a time.
  • Roll out the mixture. Divide mixture roughly in half. Spoon the first half of the mixture onto a piece of parchment paper, cover it with another piece of parchment paper, and roll it out into a thin sheet. If you happen to have any holes in the rolled out mixture, just grab a little bit of the mixture and patch it.
  • Score the mixture. Remove the top layer of parchment paper and using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like.
  • Bake. Transfer the mixture (with the bottom sheet of parchment paper) onto a large baking sheet and bake until crispy and golden brown, about 30 minutes, flipping halfway through baking. If one side of the crackers is more golden than the other, rotate the baking sheet for the best chance of all the crackers baking evenly. I usually only do this once, halfway through baking time.
  • Cool. Transfer the baked "cracker" onto a cooling rack and let cool completely. Then break the cracker along the scored lines.
  • Store. Leftover crackers keep well in an airtight container at a room temperature for up to 1 week. For longer term storage, refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 1 month or freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

Notes

*The easiest way to flip the cracker is to slide the parchment paper from the baking sheet onto a big cutting board. Then cover the cutting board with the baking sheet and flip the cutting board over.
**Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.
This recipe has been adapted from My New Roots.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 64, Calories: 57kcal, Carbohydrates: 4g, Protein: 2g, Fat: 4g, Fiber: 3g, Sugar: 1g