seed breadThis nut and seed bread is quite unique in that it’s not light, fluffy, and airy like your typical flour-based bread. Quite the opposite – it’s chewy, nutty, hearty, and filling. The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, and refined sugar-free. 

Growing up in Europe, bread was something that accompanied almost every meal of the day. Soft and warm baguettes in France, nutritional dark and hearty rugbrød in Denmark, fluffy and chewy tijgerbrood in Netherlands, thin and salty pretzels in Germany, crusty round kaiser buns in Austria, herbaceous flat focaccia in Italy, or pita-like lepinja in Croatia.

While every bread is special in its own way, one of the European breads always stood out to me – the Norwegian fjellbrød. If you’re all about a dense and hearty loaf of bread, the fjellbrød is all you need. It’s free of sugar, free of white flour, and loaded with whole grains and seeds. It’s also incredibly easy to make – since it’s a no-knead bread, there’s no rising or final proofing.

So, today I’m sharing with you a recipe for dark and dense nut and seed bread. While it‘s not fjellbrød per se, it’s just as wholesome and easy to make.

seed bread - vegan, paleo, keto

Tips for Making Nut and Seed Bread

Ingredients

  • Nuts: almonds and hazelnuts are my go-to nuts for this bread. They are a type of hard nuts, and so they are easy to grind into a fine meal. Soft, chewy nuts, such as walnuts and pecans, work too, but you have to be more careful not to over-process them.
  • Seeds: there are two types of seeds in this bread recipe – non-gelatinous and gelatinous. Non-gelatinous seeds include sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, hemp seeds… any seeds that don’t gel when you mix them with water. You can easily substitute one variety for another, use them in different combinations, or swap them for nuts. Gelatinous seeds, such as chia seeds and flax seeds, have special binding properties and help the bread hold together. You can use them in different ratios, but not substitute them for non-gelatinous seeds or nuts.
  • Psyllium: the main ingredient holding this seed bread together is psyllium – a form of soluble fiber derived from the outer portion of the seeds of the Plantago ovata plant. It’s typically processed into one of three forms: whole psyllium husk, psyllium husk powder, and psyllium seed powder. Although each supplement is derived from the same raw seeds, they contain different amounts of soluble fiber, which changes the product’s properties. Psyllium husk – whole or powdered – contains only Plantago ovata seed husks. Psyllium seed powder consists of the husk and seed ground together. This recipe calls for whole psyllium husk.
  • Coconut oil: the oil tenderizes the bread, makes it moist, and prevents it from drying out. You can use any oil you like, reduce the amount, or leave it out completely if you’re avoiding oils. It’s not an essential ingredient, but it does help with the texture of the bread.
  • Salt: the primary purpose of salt here is to evoke and enhance the flavor of bread. Adding even only a little bit manifestly changes the perception of bread’s flavor, eliciting the full spectrum of complex flavor notes, including a sweetness that would be otherwise absent.

nut and seed bread ingredients

How to Make Nut and Seed Bread

At first glance, the recipe looks impossible; as though it won’t work. There is no blooming, no kneading, no proofing… but mix all the ingredients together and you will find yourself hooked. Here is the step-by-step process:

  1. Process the nuts. Add the almonds and hazelnuts into a food processor fitted with an S blade and process the nuts into a fine meal. Be careful not to over-process the nuts. If you don’t like a lot of texture, you can also process the sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds or at least chop them up. If you don’t have a food processor, you can use a high-speed blender to turn nuts into flour or start with almond flour (as opposed to whole nuts).
  2. Mix the dry ingredients. Add the processed nuts, seeds, psyllium, and salt into a large bowl and mix until well combined.
  3. Make the dough. Add the coconut oil and water into the bowl and mix again. As the gelatinous seeds and psyllium absorb all the water, all the ingredients will sort of clump together into a very thick dough. If the dough is too thick or some of the dry ingredients aren’t completely soaked, add more water, 1 Tbsp./15 ml at a time.
  4. Bake. Transfer the dough into a parchment paper-lined 8 x 4 inch/20 x 10 cm loaf pan and bake it at 350ºF/175ºC for 45 minutes. Then remove the bread from the loaf pan, place it directly on a baking sheet (or an oven rack), and bake it for another 20-25 minutes.
  5. Cool. Transfer the bread onto a cooling rack and let it cool completely before slicing. The bread will continue to firm up as it cools.

how to make nut and seed bread

Seed Bread Variations

I have tried so many variations of this nut and seed bread. Other than experimenting with different nuts and seeds, you can also add dried fruit (cranberries and raisins are my favorite), maple syrup, and spices (cinnamon and nutmeg go really well with cranberries). If you’d like to turn the savory seed bread into more of a sweet bread, you can substitute the coconut oil for apple sauce or pumpkin puree. 

If you try this recipe, please, leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

nut and seed bread

seed bread
5 from 26 votes

Nut and Seed Bread

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Yield: 16 slices
This nut and seed bread is quite unique in that it's not light, fluffy, and airy like your typical flour-based bread. Quite the opposite - it’s chewy, nutty, hearty, and filling. The recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, and refined sugar-free. 

Ingredients
 

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 350°F/175°C.
  • Process the nuts. Add the almonds and hazelnuts into a food processor fitted with an S blade and process into a fine meal. Be careful not to over-process the nuts. If you don't like a lot of texture, you can also process the sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds.
  • Mix the dry ingredients. Add the processed nuts, seeds, psyllium, and salt into a large bowl and mix until well combined.
  • Make the dough. Add the coconut oil and water into the bowl and mix again. If the dough is too thick or some of the dry ingredients aren't completely soaked, add more water, 1 Tbsp./15 ml at a time.
  • Bake. Transfer the dough into a parchment paper-lined 8 x 4 inch/20 x 10 cm loaf pan and press it into an even layer. Smooth out the top and bake for 45 minutes. After 45 minutes, remove the bread from the pan and place it directly on a baking sheet (or an oven rack). Bake for another 15-25 minutes.
  • Cool. Transfer the bread onto a cooling rack and let it cool completely before slicing. The bread will continue to firm up as it cools.
  • Store. Leftover bread keeps well in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. For longer term storage, slice the bread and store it in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 3 months.
    Roasted, chopped, and ground nuts go rancid more quickly than whole raw ones. So, storing the bread in a cool place is really important.

Notes

*Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.
This recipe has been adapted from My New Roots.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice, Calories: 229kcal, Carbohydrates: 15g, Protein: 6g, Fat: 17g, Fiber: 11g, Sugar: 1g