seed crackers

Seed crackers seem to be all the rage these days. They are crunchy, flavorful, and really easy to make. Since the crackers don’t contain anything but seeds, the recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

I have made so many variations of seed crackers over the years. The options are endless, but the recipe below is my favorite.

The combination of colors and textures from the variety of seeds is truly impressive. These seed crackers also taste great and have a crispy texture even days after baking. How? It’s the magical power of seeds, which are nutrient-dense and crunchy, leaving you feeling satisfied.

You can use any seeds you like for this recipe, but you must include at least one type of gelatinous seeds, such as flax seeds or chia seeds, which will serve as a binding agent and build structure in these crackers. 

seed crackers with flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, and sesame seeds

Tips for Making Seed Crackers

Ingredients

The name says it all, really. These crackers are made entirely out of seeds:

  • Flax seeds: if you like a nutty flavor, you will really appreciate flax seeds. Of course, the main purpose of flax seeds in this recipe is to bind all the seeds together, but they also add a wonderful nuttiness and earthiness. If you’re not a fan, you could use them in combination with chia seeds, which are practically tasteless.
  • Sunflower seeds: shelled sunflower seeds have a mild, nutty flavor and a firm yet tender texture. They add to the textural variety in these crackers, but are not an essential ingredient. If you don’t have them on hand, you can substitute them for coarsely chopped pumpkin seeds or more sesame seeds.
  • Sesame seeds: just like sunflower seeds, white sesame seeds have a mild, nutty flavor but are sweeter and chewier. Black sesame seeds are great as  well, but taste slightly bitter as a result of the hulls being present. I typically use a mix of the two.
  • Salt: doesn’t salt just make everything taste better? It adds savoriness, brings out nuttiness, and enhances the overall flavor of these seed crackers. Himalayan salt is my favorite as it is the ultimate mineral-rich seasoning.

ingredients for seed crackers

How to Make Seed Crackers

Homemade crackers are one of those things that seem to be more effort than they’d be worth. But in reality, making crackers, especially these seed crackers, is surprisingly easy. Ready to learn how to make crackers?

  1. Mix. Add all the seeds and salt into a large bowl and stir everything until well combined. Add the water and stir once again. After about a minute, you’ll notice that the mixture begins to thicken.
  2. Let the mixture rest. The key to making these crackers work is to allow the flax seeds absorb all the water and gel. A couple of minutes should be all you need. If you don’t let the mixture rest for long enough time, the water will settle out of the mix once you spread it onto the baking sheet. If you let it rest for too long, you’ll have a hard time getting the mixture spread thinly enough.
  3. Spread the mixture. Transfer the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet (you might need to use more than one) and spread it into an even, thin layer. Make sure you spread the mixture as evenly as possible. The thickness of the crackers is up to you. Thinner crackers will be more delicate but more prone to breaking. Thicker crackers will be sturdier.
  4. Score the mixture. Using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like. I went with diamond shapes, but it’s up to you. If you’re going for a more rustic look, skip the scoring.
  5. Bake. Bake the crackers for 30 minutes. Then carefully flip the entire “cracker” over, peel the parchment paper off the back, and bake until the edges are golden brown, about 20 minutes. You can adjust the baking time (+/- 10 minutes) depending on how golden and crispy you prefer your seeds to be. You can also increase the oven temperature to up to 350°F/177°C, but keep an eye on the crackers because they can burn quickly.
  6. Cool. Transfer the baked cracker onto a cooling rack, so air can circulate and no condensation — the killer of crunch — takes hold. The higher the baking temperature, the more condensation can form. Once cool, break the cracker along the scored lines. If you haven’t scored the cracker beforehand, just break it apart into pieces.

how to make seed crackers

Seed Crackers Variations

These seed crackers are literally a blank canvas for experimentation.

Like garlic? Mince it and throw it in there. Italian herbs? Delicious. Sun-dried tomatoes? A great idea! Appreciate a little bit of a kick? Add some black pepper. You can also reduce the amount of salt, half-dip the crackers in dark chocolate, and let them set. It’s the perfect mix of sweet and salty. 

I usually divide the mixture and make a few different types of crackers from one batch. 

Note: The only two things you don’t want to change are the ratio of seeds to water and the ratio of gelatinous seeds to other ingredients.

multi-seed crackers

How to Store Seed Crackers

  • Room temperature: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and store in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week.
  • Refrigerating: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 1 month.
  • Freezing: transfer the crackers into an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. 

More Seed Crackers Recipes

Judging from the number of crackers recipes with nuts and/or seeds on my blog, I am clearly a fan.

  • Flaxseed crackers: these crackers are perhaps the most popular on the blog. They are made entirely from flaxseeds, so other than being slightly nutty, they are very neutral in flavor. Flax seeds are a weak binder, but since there are no ingredients to bind (other than the flax seeds themselves), the crackers are quite sturdy.
  • Nut & seed crackers: my absolute favorite seed crackers. Nutty, crunchy, and because the main binder is psyllium – a strong binder – the crackers are also very sturdy.
  • Chia seed crackers: if you’re looking for seed crackers with a bread-like texture, this recipe is it! These crackers have a slightly sweet, nutty flavor and a crunchy, bread-like texture. They are also sturdy enough to scoop up the thickest dip.
  • Flackers: crackers made entirely from whole flax seeds. They are nutty and incredibly crunchy – similar to sesame brittle but without the sweetness. 

If you try any of these recipes, please, leave a comment and rate the recipe below. It always means a lot when you do.

seed crackers
5 from 1 vote

Seed Crackers

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Yield: 24 crackers
Seed crackers seem to be all the rage these days. They are crunchy, flavorful, and really easy to make. Since the crackers don't contain anything but seeds, the recipe is vegan (dairy-free, egg-free), grain-free (gluten-free), soy-free, nut-free, and refined sugar-free.

Ingredients
 

  • 3/4 cup (84 g) golden flaxseed meal
  • 1/2 cup (70 g) sunflower seeds
  • 1/3 cup (50 g) sesame seeds
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water
  • 1/2 tsp. (5.7 g) sea salt

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 300°F/150°C.
  • Mix. Add all the seeds and salt into a large bowl and stir everything until well combined. Add the water and stir once again. After about a minute, you'll notice that the mixture begins to thicken.
  • Let the mixture rest. The key to making these crackers work is to allow the flaxseeds absorb all the water and gel. A couple of minutes should be enough.
  • Spread the mixture. Transfer the mixture onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet (you might need to use more than one) and spread it into an even, thin layer. A spatula is great for this, but if you don’t have one, just wet your hands and kind of pat it down. Try not to leave any holes. The thickness of the crackers is up to you. Thinner crackers will be more delicate but more prone to breaking. Thicker crackers will be sturdier.
  • Score the mixture. Using the tip of a knife, score the mixture into any shapes you like. I went with diamond shapes, but it's up to you. If you're going for a more rustic look, skip the scoring.
  • Bake. Transfer the mixture (with the bottom sheet of parchment paper) onto a large baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes. Then carefully flip the entire "cracker" over*, peel the parchment paper off the back and bake until the edges are golden brown, about 20 minutes. You can adjust the baking time (+/- 10 minutes) depending on how golden and crispy you prefer your seeds to be. You can also increase the oven temperature to up to 350°F/177°C, but keep an eye on the crackers because they can burn quickly.
  • Cool. Transfer the baked "cracker" onto a cooling rack and let cool completely. Then break the cracker along the scored lines.
  • Store. Leftover crackers keep well in an airtight container in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 1 week (or in the refrigerator for up to 1 month). For longer term storage, freeze in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

Notes

*The easiest way to flip the cracker is to slide the parchment paper from the baking sheet onto a big cutting board. Then cover the cutting board with the baking sheet and flip the cutting board over.
**Nutrition information is approximate and may contain errors. Please, feel free to make your own calculations.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 24, Calories: 56kcal, Carbohydrates: 3g, Protein: 2g, Fat: 5g, Fiber: 2g, Sugar: 0g